You have no items in your shopping cart.

PFG Bank: Credit Card Exercise (SIMULATION)
Pfeifer, Phillip E. Forio Simulation M-0878 / Published April 24, 2015 / 1 pages.
Format Price Quantity Select
Student License
Call for pricing
Session ID*

Product Overview

This online exercise describes the beginnings of the product-design process at a fictitious firm, PFG Bank (PFG). PFG has a variety of different products (12 versions of a credit card) and detailed information, summarized by a credit score, about several thousand potential customers. The question at hand is which product(s) should be offered through direct mail to which customers. PFG's answer (sometimes called test-cell marketing) was to conduct a test of selected combinations of products and customers. After the customers were assigned to three groups, PFG test mailed a random sample of prospects from each of the 36 test cells. The products that performed best for each of the three groups would then be rolled out. Because it was usually the case that no single product performed best for all groups, the ability to tailor product offerings increased company profits. This simulation has been used in the Darden School's "Direct Marketing" course elective.

Learning Objectives

-To demonstrate test-cell marketing. -To illustrate the benefits of product tailoring.

  • Overview

    This online exercise describes the beginnings of the product-design process at a fictitious firm, PFG Bank (PFG). PFG has a variety of different products (12 versions of a credit card) and detailed information, summarized by a credit score, about several thousand potential customers. The question at hand is which product(s) should be offered through direct mail to which customers. PFG's answer (sometimes called test-cell marketing) was to conduct a test of selected combinations of products and customers. After the customers were assigned to three groups, PFG test mailed a random sample of prospects from each of the 36 test cells. The products that performed best for each of the three groups would then be rolled out. Because it was usually the case that no single product performed best for all groups, the ability to tailor product offerings increased company profits. This simulation has been used in the Darden School's "Direct Marketing" course elective.

  • Learning Objectives

    Learning Objectives

    -To demonstrate test-cell marketing. -To illustrate the benefits of product tailoring.